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posted : 2010.Oct.04 @ 4.39am
Greetings, all. This is my first post here. I lurked a tiny bit a few months ago and enjoyed the visual art dimensions of what you-all do here.

I posted the following message a few months ago on the visual art forum at www.forums.ayahuasca.com and someone replied by saying I should post it here. That made sense to me, and I'm finally getting around to it.

The message:

"Yo, artists.

This might be a total brain-fart, but I think that it would be sweet if some artist re-illustrated parts of the Voynich Manuscript. The author had a fantastic visual imagination -- & IMAO the illustrations are of personal visions -- but pretty mediocre skills as an illustrator.

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Categ ... manuscript

Someone has done a lovely 3D rendering of one of the most famous images here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NGrNIB0sHYk -- it's this one: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 158%29.jpg

To me, this one http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... 152%29.jpg shows weather spirits pouring out snow and rain (from the crossed gourd-shaped objects) and maybe blowing wind.

I'm fascinated by the "vehicles" that the figures ride. In my notes on the MS I've been calling them "celways" for "celestial Segway"... I'm sort of working on a dissertation about the VMs but it's sort of going nowhere."

If nothing else, it's a way to put some of you in touch with "the world's most mysterious manuscript" (and one of the world's weirdest), if you haven't met it before. McKenna wrote about it, maybe in The Archaic Revival

The basic story of the VMs is that:

*According to carbon dating (2009) it seems to have been made between 1403 and 1438.
*It seems to have been sold to an Austro-Hungarian emperor in Prague 200 years later for the equivalent of $30,000, but he couldn't decode it.
*Some Jesuits had it for a while. They couldn't decode it either.
*A Polish book dealer called Wilfrid Voynich bought it in Italy in like 1912 and brought it to the USA. Now it lives at Yale University's Beinecke Library.
*It has totally bizarre illustrations and a script that no-one can read.

OK, that's all from me for now. Have fun checking this out.

Woodpecker/Nathan






    

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